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The 18th century church of St. John the Baptist in Cieplice, now part of Jelenia Góra, Southwest Poland. 
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The 18th century church of St. John the Baptist in Cieplice, now part of Jelenia Góra, Southwest Poland.

"The church belonged to the former Cistercian monastery complex. The first chapel was presumably erected here by Duke Bolesław Wysoki in 1175. A fire in 1711 destroyed all buildings except for the belfry (1709-1710). The present, single-nave church was erected between 1712 and 1714. The interior contains elegant baroque furnishings, including the high altar (1716), 8 side altars (the 18th c.) and the organ (1765). Since 1601 members of the Cieplice line of the Schaffgotsch family were buried in the crypt underneath the presbytery. The surrounding wall includes 15 tombstones brought here from Radomierz in 1849." (From the information plaque near the church).
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St. John the Baptist's church in CiepliceSt. John the Baptist's church in Cieplice: the southern portalSt. John the Baptist's church in Cieplice: the southern portal
The Vang stave church in Karpacz, Southwest Poland. 
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The Vang stave church in Karpacz, Southwest Poland.
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The Vang stave church in KarpaczThe Vang stave church in KarpaczThe Vang stave church in KarpaczThe Vang stave church in Karpacz
Inside the Vang stave church in Karpacz, Southwest Poland. 
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Inside the Vang stave church in Karpacz, Southwest Poland.

"Vang stave church (Polish: Świątynia Wang; Norwegian: Vang stavkyrkje; German: Stabkirche Wang) is a stave church which was bought by the Prussian King and transferred from Vang in Norway and re-erected in 1842 in Brückenberg near Krummhübel in Germany, now Karpacz in the Karkonosze mountains of Poland. The church is a four-post single-nave stave church originally built around 1200 in the parish of Vang in the Valdres region of Norway.".
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An interior detail from the Vang stave church in KarpaczAn interior detail from the Vang stave church in KarpaczAn interior detail from the Vang stave church in KarpaczAn interior detail from the Vang stave church in KarpaczAn interior detail from the Vang stave church in Karpacz
Inside the Sedlec Ossuary, a small Roman Catholic chapel, located beneath the Cemetery Church of All Saints in Sedlec, a suburb of Kutná Hora in the Czech Republic. 
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Inside the Sedlec Ossuary, a small Roman Catholic chapel, located beneath the Cemetery Church of All Saints in Sedlec, a suburb of Kutná Hora in the Czech Republic.

The ossuary is estimated to contain the skeletons of between 40,000 and 70,000 people, many of whom have had their bones artistically arranged to form decorations and furnishings for the chapel.

Henry, the abbot of the Cistercian monastery in Sedlec, was sent to the Palestine (Holy Land) by King Otakar II of Bohemia in 1278. When he returned, he brought with him a small amount of earth he had removed from Golgotha and sprinkled it over the abbey cemetery. The word of this pious act soon spread and the cemetery in Sedlec became a desirable burial site throughout Central Europe. During the Black Death in the mid 14th century, and after the Hussite Wars in the early 15th century, many thousands of people were buried there and the cemetery had to be greatly enlarged.

Around 1400 a Gothic church was built in the center of the cemetery with a vaulted upper level and a lower chapel to be used as an ossuary for the mass graves unearthed during construction, or simply slated for demolition to make room for new burials. After 1511 the task of exhuming skeletons and stacking their bones in the chapel was, according to legend, given to a half-blind monk of the order.

Between 1703 and 1710 a new entrance was constructed to support the front wall, which was leaning outward, and the upper chapel was rebuilt. This work, in the Czech Baroque style, was designed by Jan Santini Aichel.

In 1870, František Rint, a woodcarver, was employed by the Schwarzenberg family to put the bone heaps into order. The macabre result of his effort speaks for itself. Four enormous bell-shaped mounds occupy the corners of the chapel. An enormous chandelier of bones, which contains at least one of every bone in the human body, hangs from the center of the nave with garlands of skulls draping the vault. Other works include piers and monstrances flanking the altar, a large Schwarzenberg coat-of-arms, and the signature of Rint, also executed in bone, on the wall near the entrance. (Text from Wikipedia).

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The Sedlec OssuaryThe Sedlec OssuaryThe Sedlec OssuaryThe Sedlec OssuaryThe Sedlec OssuaryThe Sedlec OssuaryThe Sedlec OssuaryThe Sedlec OssuaryThe Sedlec OssuaryThe Sedlec Ossuary
Inside the Sedlec Ossuary in of Kutná Hora in the Czech Republic. 
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Inside the Sedlec Ossuary in of Kutná Hora in the Czech Republic.
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The Sedlec OssuaryThe Sedlec OssuaryThe Sedlec Ossuary
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Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
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