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The night view of Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, from the highest point of the Narikala Fortress that towers above the city centre. 
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The night view of Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, from the highest point of the Narikala Fortress that towers above the city centre.
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Inside the 11th-century Svetitskhoveli Cathedral in Mtskheta, a former capital of Georgia. 
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Inside the 11th-century Svetitskhoveli Cathedral in Mtskheta, a former capital of Georgia.

"Svetitskhoveli, known as the burial site of Christ's mantle, has long been the principal Georgian church and remains one of the most venerated places of worship to this day. It presently functions as the seat of the archbishop of Mtskheta and Tbilisi, who is at the same time Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia. The current cathedral was built in the 11th century by the Georgian architect Arsukisdze, though the site itself is even older dating back to the early 4th century and is surrounded by a number of legends associated primarily with the early Christian traditions. It is the second largest church building in the country, after the recently consecrated Tbilisi Holy Trinity Cathedral, and is listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site along with other historical monuments of Mtskheta." (Text from Wikipedia).
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The Svetitskhoveli Cathedral in Mtskheta
The Gergeti Trinity Church (წმიჶდა სამება, Tsminda Sameba) on a hill (2170 m) above the town of Kazbegi (aka Stepantsminda) in north-eastern Georgia. 
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The Gergeti Trinity Church (წმიჶდა სამება, Tsminda Sameba) on a hill (2170 m) above the town of Kazbegi (aka Stepantsminda) in north-eastern Georgia.

"The Gergeti Trinity Church was built in the 14th century, and is the only cross-cupola church in Khevi province. The separate belltower dates from the same period as the church itself. Its isolated location on top of a steep mountain surrounded by the vastness of nature has made it a symbol for Georgia. The 18th century Georgian author Vakhushti Batonishvili wrote that in times of danger, precious relics from Mtskheta, including Saint Nino's Cross were brought here for safekeeping. During the Soviet era, all religious services were prohibited, but the church remained a popular tourist destination. The church is now an active establishment of the Georgian Orthodox and Apostolic Church. The church is a popular waypoint for trekkers in the area, and can be reached by a steep 3 hour climb up the mountain, or around 30 minutes by jeep up a rough mountain trail." (Text from Wikipedia).
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Jeep track to Tsminda SamebaTsminda Sameba: almost thereTsminda SamebaTsminda SamebaMountains above Kazbegi
Eastern Caucasus from the viewing point near the Georgian Military Road, high above the valley of the White Aragvi river. 
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Eastern Caucasus from the viewing point near the Georgian Military Road, high above the valley of the White Aragvi river.
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Georgian Military Road viewing pointSherkhota (3670 m)
The Georgian Military Road near its highest point: the Jvari Pass (2379 m). 
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The Georgian Military Road near its highest point: the Jvari Pass (2379 m).

"The Georgian Military Road runs between Tbilisi (Georgia) and Vladikavkaz (Russia) and follows the traditional route used by invaders and traders throughout the ages. The road stretches some 208 kilometers through the Terek valley, crosses the Rocky Ridge in the Darial Gorge, past Mount Kazbek, and Gergeti Trinity Church, then leads through the canyon of the Baidarka River to the Jvari Pass, where it reaches an altitude of 2379 meters. It continues along the Tetri Aragvi River past the medieval fortress of Ananuri and Zemo Avchala, a hydroelectric dam and follows the right bank of the Kura (Mtkvari) River past the ancient town of Mtskheta to Tbilisi.

Known since antiquity (it was mentioned by Strabo in his Geographica and by Pliny), the Georgian Military Road in its present form was begun by the Russian military in 1799, after the Georgians by the Treaty of Georgievsk, abjured from century long Persian suzerainty. After the Kingdom of Georgia was officially annexed by the Russian Empire in 1801, Tsar Alexander I ordered General Aleksey Petrovich Yermolov, commander-in-chief of Russian forces in the Caucasus to improve the surfacing of the road to facilitate troop movement and communications. When Yermolov announced the completion of work in 1817, the highway was heralded as the ‶Russian Simplon”. However, work continued until 1863. By this stage it had cost £4,000,000 (a staggering sum in the 1860s) but according to Bryce in 1876 was of a high quality with two or three lanes and ‶iron bridges over the torrents”, something he considered astonishing given that within Russia proper at this time decent roads were virtually non-existent." (Text from Wikipedia).

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Georgian Military Road
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Sunday, Aug 21, 2016: The symbolic cemetery of mountain victims at Zverovka in Slovak Tatra mountains
Zverovka symbolic cemetery
Da się tym niebieskim hashem pod opisem i tagami :-) Tak czy siak, znalazłem zdjęcie, o które chodziło. Widoki rzeczywiście lepsze... (zbooy)
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