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Inside the 16th century church of Il Gesù in Rome. 
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Inside the 16th century church of Il Gesù in Rome.

This baroque church, located in the Piazza del Gesù, is the mother church of the Jesuit order. It introduced the baroque style into architecture and served as model for innumerable Jesuit churches all over the world. Although Michelangelo, at the request of the Spanish cardinal Bartolomeo de la Cueva, offered, out of devotion, to design the church for free, the endeavor was funded by Cardinal Alessandro Farnese, grandson of Pope Paul III, the pope who had authorized the founding of the Society of Jesus. Ultimately, the main architects involved in the construction were Giacomo Barozzi da Vignola, architect of the Farnese family, and Giacomo della Porta. The most striking feature of the interior decoration is the ceiling fresco is the grandiose Triumph of the Name of Jesus by Giovanni Battista Gaulli. Gaulli also frescoed the cupola, including lantern and pendentives, central vault, window recesses, and transepts' ceilings. (Text based on Wikipedia).
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Frescoes in the Il Gesù church in RomeFrescoes in the Il Gesù church in Rome
Inside the chapel of Madonna Della Strada in the Jesuit church of Il Gesù in Rome. 
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Inside the chapel of Madonna Della Strada in the Jesuit church of Il Gesù in Rome.

Wikipedia: The Madonna Della Strada is the patroness of the Society of Jesus. Its founder, Ignatius of Loyola, was said to have been protected by the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary during battle in his service as a soldier. The name goes back to a shrine established in Rome in the 5th century by the Astalli family, originally known as the Madonna degli Astalli. In 1568, Cardinal Alessandro Farnese erected the Gesù Church of Rome, the mother church of the Jesuits, in place of the former church of Santa Maria della Strada. The icon is located between two altars, the first dedicated to St. Ignatius, the second, the main altar of the Church, dedicated to the Holy Name of Jesus. The icon was restored in 2006, revealing at least two layers of previous paint, the original art being a fresco which had been detached from a wall and affixed to canvas.
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Madonna Della Strada
Inside the church of Sts. Cosmas and Damian (Santi Cosma e Damiano) in the Roman Forum. 
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Inside the church of Sts. Cosmas and Damian (Santi Cosma e Damiano) in the Roman Forum.
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Mosaics in the church of Santi Cosma e Damiano, RomeMosaics in the church of Santi Cosma e Damiano, Rome
Inside Sant'Ignazio, the Baroque church in Rome, dedicated to St. Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), the founder of the Society of Jesus. 
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Inside Sant'Ignazio, the Baroque church in Rome, dedicated to St. Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), the founder of the Society of Jesus.

"The vault of the nave has Rome's most famous baroque fresco (1693-1694). The artist, Andrea Pozzo, a Jesuit, was a master of perspective. By using trompe l'oeil architecture, he extends the height of the building and opens it to the heavens. The fresco depicts the Society of Jesus' missionary activity throughout the world; the Savior sends a ray of light into the heart of Ignatius; this, in turn, is transmitted to the then four known continents (Africa, America, Asia, and Europe), where Jesuit missionaries were active." (Joseph N. Tylenda: The Pilgrim's Guide to Rome's Principal Churches, Kansas City 2010).
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The trompe l'oeil ceiling of Sant'Ignazio church, RomeThe trompe l'oeil ceiling of Sant'Ignazio church, Rome
Inside the church of Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Rome. 
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Inside the church of Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Rome.

Wikipedia: The Basilica of Saint Mary Above Minerva (Italian: Basilica di Santa Maria sopra Minerva) is a titular minor basilica and one of the most important churches of the Roman Catholic Dominican order in Rome, Italy. The church, located in the Piazza della Minerva in the Campus Martius region, is considered the only Gothic church in Rome. It houses the tombs of the St. Catherine of Siena and the Dominican painter Fra Angelico. The basilica gets its name because, like many early Christian basilicas, it was built directly over (sopra) the foundations of a temple dedicated to the Egyptian goddess Isis, but erroneously ascribed to the Greco-Roman goddess Minerva. Behind a self-effacing facade, its arched vaulting is painted with brilliant red ribbing, and blue with gilded stars, a 19th century restoration in the Gothic taste. The basilica is located on the small piazza Minerva close to the Pantheon, in the rione Pigna.

To the left of the main altar there is a marble sculpture of Christ the Redeemer by the master Michelangelo Buonarroti, finished in 1521.

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Michelangelo's marble Christ the Redeemer in the church of Santa Maria sopra Minerva
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Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
Palácio da Pena
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