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Inside the church of San Lorenzo in Lucina in Rome, Italy. 
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Inside the church of San Lorenzo in Lucina in Rome, Italy.

"The most ancient memories of the basilica go back to the 5th century. It was later completely rebuilt by Pasquale II (1099-1118) and consecrated in 1130 by Anacletus II, the antipope. For a long time, the church served the outer limits of the populated area to the north. At the end of the 16th century, it came to have one of the largest number of parishioners. In 1606, Paul V granted it to the Chierici Regolari Minori of St. Francis Caraccioli, known as the Caracciolini. Towards the end of the 17th century, drastic rebuilding got underway, directed by Cosimo Fanzago (1591-1678), of which only the marble inlay pulpit and two baptismal fonts survive today. The nave shows its 19th century character, due to the restoration undertaken in 1856-60 by Pope Pius IX (whose coat of arms is repeated twice in the lacunar ceiling)." (Text found inside the church).
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San Lorenzo in Lucina, Rome: the tomb of Nicolas PoussinSan Lorenzo in Lucina, Rome: the tomb of Nicolas PoussinSan Lorenzo in Lucina, RomeSan Lorenzo in Lucina, RomeSan Lorenzo in Lucina, Rome: Christ on the Cross by Guide ReniSan Lorenzo in Lucina, RomeSan Lorenzo in Lucina, Rome
Inside the church of Santa Maria in Via on Via del Mortaro in Rome, Italy. 
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Inside the church of Santa Maria in Via on Via del Mortaro in Rome, Italy.

Wikipedia: "The church or a chapel existed in the 9th century, but was rebuilt following reports of a miracle. In 1165, it is recorded as Santa Maria in Via, whose appellative means "on the Way", with a reference to the close by Via Flaminia.

On the site there was the house of Cardinal Pietro Capocci, with a well in the stables. On the night of 26 September 1256, the well overflowed. A picture of Our Lady was floating on the waters, which disappeared as soon as the picture was taken. Pope Alexander IV declared it a miracle, and ordered the construction of a chapel on its place; in the chapel (the first on the right of the current church) there is still the well of the miracle.

Pope Innocent VIII ordered the construction of the current church, which was built in 1491-1513. Renovations were performed under Francesco da Volterra and later by Carlo Lombardi. The façade and portico were designed by Pietro da Cortona (1660). The main altar was decorated by Santi Ghetti. The works were completed under Cardinal Saint Robert Bellarmine, titular of the church, in 1604. [...] The current Cardinal-Priest is Raúl Eduardo Vela Chiriboga from Ecuador. The church serves as a national church in Rome for the Ecuadorian community.

The church has been served by the Servite Order since a grant of Pope Leo X in 1513".

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A traditional nativity scene (il presepio) in the church of Santa Maria in Via on Via del Mortaro in Rome, Italy. 
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A traditional nativity scene (il presepio) in the church of Santa Maria in Via on Via del Mortaro in Rome, Italy.
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The nativity scene in the Santa Maria in Via church in RomeThe nativity scene in the Santa Maria in Via church in RomeThe nativity scene in the Santa Maria in Via church in Rome
Inside the church of San Marcello on Via del Corso in Rome, Italy. 
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Inside the church of San Marcello on Via del Corso in Rome, Italy.

Wikipedia: "While the tradition holds that the church was built over the prison of Pope Marcellus I (d. 309), it is known that the Titulus Marcelli was already present in 418, when Pope Boniface I was elected here. The "Septiformis" litany, commanded by Pope Gregory I in 590, saw the men moving from San Marcello. Pope Adrian I, in the 8th century, built a church on the same place, which is currently under the modern church. The corpse of Cola di Rienzo, was held in the church for three days after his execution in 1354. On 22 May 1519 a fire destroyed the church. The money collected for its rebuilding was used to bribe the landsknechts, who were pillaging the city during the Sack of Rome (1527). The original plan to rebuild the church was designed by Jacopo Sansovino, who fled the city during the Sack and never returned to finish it. The work was continued by Antonio da Sangallo the Younger, who rebuilt the church, but a Tiber flood damaged it again in 1530. It was only in 1592 that the church was completed, and later Carlo Fontana built the facade."

"The church is baroque in style and has a single nave with five chapels on each side. The gilded coffered ceiling dates from 1592, the gift of Mons. Giulio Vitelli, whose family coats of arms are depicted there. An image of the Virgin is in the center; other compartments have Marian symbols derived from the Litany of Loreto. The fourteen frescoes next to the windows in the nave depict scenes from our Lord's Passion and Resurrection and are by Giovanni Battista Ricci. His is also the huge "Crucifixion" (1613) on the rear wall over the entrance. Beneath the fresco, and left of the entrance door, is the monument to Cardinal Francesco Cenini (d. 1645), titular (1621-1645)." (Joseph N. Tylenda: The Pilgrim's Guide to Rome's Principal Churches, Kansas City 2010).

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Inside the church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio a Trevi in Rome, Italy. 
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Inside the church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio a Trevi in Rome, Italy.

"In the crypt beneath the church are preserved the hearts and viscera — removed for embalming — of many of the poopes from Sixtus V, who died in 1590, to Leo XIII, who died in 1903. Ss. Vincenzo and Anastasio is the parish church of the Quirinal Palace where most of them lived. However, given time is short, avoid going into the church as the interior is surprisingly disappointing given the splendid façade, having been heavily restored in the nineteenth century." (Georgina Masson: The Companion Guide to Rome, Woodbridge 2009).
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Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
Palácio da Pena
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