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The Two Towers of Bologna, Italy, in the middle of a snowy night. 
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The Two Towers of Bologna, Italy, in the middle of a snowy night.

The Two Towers, both of them leaning, are the symbol of the city. They are located at the intersection of the roads that lead to the five gates of the old ring wall. The taller one is called the Asinelli while the smaller but more leaning tower is called the Garisenda. Their names derive from the families which are traditionally credited for their construction between 1109 and 1119.

It is believed that the Asinelli Tower initially had a height of ca. 70 m and was raised only later to the current 97.2 m (with an overhanging rock of 2.2 m). In the 14th century the city became its owner and used it as prison and small stronghold. During this period a wooden construction was added around the tower at a height of 30 m above ground, which was connected with an aerial footbridge (later destroyed during a fire in 1398) to the Garisenda Tower.

Severe damage was caused by lightning that often resulted in small fires and collapses, and only in 1824 was a lightning rod installed. The tower survived, however, at least two documented large fires: the first in 1185 was due to arson and the second one in 1398 has already been mentioned above.

The Asinelli Tower was used by the scientists Giovanni Battista Riccioli (in 1640) and Giovanni Battista Guglielmini (in the following century) for experiments to study the motion of heavy bodies and the earth rotation. In World War II, between 1943 and 1945, it was used as a sight post: during bombing attacks, four volunteers took post at the top to direct rescue operations to places hit by allied bombs. Later, a RAI television relay was installed on top.

The Garisenda Tower has today a height of 48 m with an overhang of 3.2 m. Initially it was approximately 60 m high, but had to be lowered in the 14th century due to a yielding of the ground which left it slanting and dangerous. (Text based on Wikipedia).

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The Fountain of Neptune (Fontana di Nettuno), a monumental civic fountain located in Piazza Nettuno, next to Piazza Maggiore in Bologna, Italy. 
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The Fountain of Neptune (Fontana di Nettuno), a monumental civic fountain located in Piazza Nettuno, next to Piazza Maggiore in Bologna, Italy.

Wikipedia: "Its bronze figure of Neptune, extending his reach in a lordly gesture of stilling and controlling the waters, is an early work of Giambologna's maturity, completed about 1567.

An innovation of Giambologna's fountain designs is the fantastic and non-geometrical forms he gave to the basins into which water splashed and flowed, "curiously folded, bulging and elastic in form", as Rosalind Grippi remarked. The fountain is a model example of Mannerist taste of the courtly elite in the mid-sixteenth century: construction of the statue was commissioned by the Cardinal Legate of the city, Charles Borromeo, to symbolize the fortunate recent election of Borromeo's uncle as Pope Pius IV.

The work was designed by the Palermitan architect Tommaso Laureti in 1563, with an over-lifesize bronze of the god Neptune on the top, executed by Giambologna, who had submitted a model for the fountain of Neptune in Florence, but had lost the commission to Baccio Bandinelli. Before the fountain was built, an entire edifice was demolished to make space for it. The fountain was completed in 1565, and the Neptune was fixed in place within a couple of years".

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Piazza Maggiore, the 13th century main square of Bologna, Italy. 
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Piazza Maggiore, the 13th century main square of Bologna, Italy.

Covered with canvas is the Basilica of San Petronio, the fifth largest church in the world, dedicated to the patron saint of the city.
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Bologna rooftops seen from the room #16 in the Hotel Albergo Centrale. 
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Bologna rooftops seen from the room #16 in the Hotel Albergo Centrale.

Compare this with another panorama made from the same window sill by daylight eight hours later.
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Bologna rooftops seen from the room #16 in the Hotel Albergo Centrale. 
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Bologna rooftops seen from the room #16 in the Hotel Albergo Centrale.

Compare this with another panorama made from the same window sill in the middle of the night.
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Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
Palácio da Pena
Czy to już jest koniec? :( (widz)
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2005–2017