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Inside the Baroque church of Santa Maria in Campitelli in the Sant'Angelo district of Rome, Italy. 
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Inside the Baroque church of Santa Maria in Campitelli in the Sant'Angelo district of Rome, Italy.

"Santa Maria in Campitelli or Santa Maria in Portico is a church dedicated to the Virgin Mary on the Piazza di Campitelli in Rione Sant'Angelo, Rome, Italy.
The church contains a 25 cm-high icon of the Virgin Mary dated by style and dendrochronology to the 11th century, though it had previously been claimed by tradition to have appeared miraculously in 524 at the table of Galla, a Roman woman who was helping the poor, and then carried in processions since 590. It was previously housed in the now-demolished Oratory of Santa Gala, sited at what is now the piazza's far end near the Porticus Octaviae (giving the church and icon its name of "Madonna of the Portico").
The icon was believed to have saved the city from plague in 1656 (or 1658), when it was carried in procession through the streets. On account of this, the earlier church on this site was replaced by Pope Alexander VII between 1659 and 1667 with the present one, designed by Carlo Rainaldi in the high Baroque style. The pope entrusted its operation to the Clerics Regular of the Mother of God. [...]
The interior shrine of Our Lady was created to contain the icon at the same date (to a design by the Maltese artist Melchiorre Caffà, or by Giovanni Antonio de Rossi), with a "gloria" (an architectural use of light for dramatic effect as used in Bernini's statue of St. Peter in the Basilica of St Peter of 1666). There is a staircase behind the 'gloria' allowing a better view of the icon, open by request only." (Text from Wikipedia).
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Madonna of the Portico: the icon of Virgin Mary in the church of Santa Maria in Campitelli in Rome
The Fontana delle Tartarughe (The Turtle Fountain) in the Piazza Mattei, in the Sant'Angelo district of Rome, Italy. 
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The Fontana delle Tartarughe (The Turtle Fountain) in the Piazza Mattei, in the Sant'Angelo district of Rome, Italy.

Designed by Giacomo della Porta, the Fountain of the Tortoises was built in 1581-1588 and decorated with four delicate bronze youths surmounting four dolphins by the florentine sculptor Taddeo Landini. The monument represents a unique creation of artistic world of XVI century in Rome. The sculptures of youths and dolphins appear to be the most impressive feature of the fountain compared with its architectural structure with its elaborate display of polychrome precious marble varieties: "bigio antico" for the upper basin, "pavonazzetto" for the baluster, "africano" for the shells. These decorative elements make this fountain comparable to the Florentine models and make it a true gem of Manierist art.

After the restoration of the ancient Acqua Vergine Aqueduct, the "Camera Capitolina", the Council of the Capitoline Township, in 1570 decided for a comprehensive fountain building program designed by the Architect Giacomo della Porta, which would include numerous monumental fountains. According to the program a fountain was to be placed in the Piazza Giudea nearby. Muzio Mattei, a noble man whose palace was in Piazza Mattei, insisted that the fountain be moved to this square, in turn he promised to pave the square at his own expenses and keep the fountain clear.

Four bronze tortoises are placed on the edge of the upper basin. Although they give the name to the fountain they were added perhaps by the hand of G. L. Bernini himself only at the time of the 1658-59 restoration carried out by Pope Alessandro VII (1655-1667) whose name appears on the inscriptions on the basis of the monument. (Text from the nearby information plaque).

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The Turtle Fountain in RomeThe Turtle Fountain in RomeThe Turtle Fountain in Rome
The courtyard of the Palazzo Mattei di Giove in Rome, Italy. 
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The courtyard of the Palazzo Mattei di Giove in Rome, Italy.

The Palazzo Mattei di Giove is the most prominent among a group of Mattei houses that forms the insula Mattei in Rome, Italy, a block of buildings of many epochs. To distinguish this section from the others it carries the name of a Mattei fief, Giove. The Mattei owned a number of other palazzi that carried the family name including Palazzo Mattei di Trastevere across the Tiber as well as properties in Umbria, the Palazzo Mattei Paganica.

Carlo Maderno designed the palace at the beginning of the 17th century for Asdrubale Mattei, Marquis di Giove and father of Girolamo Mattei and Luigi Mattei. It was Maderno who was responsible for the extravagantly enriched cornice on the otherwise rather plain stuccoed public façade, the piano nobile loggia in the courtyard and the rooftop loggia or altana. For the interior of the palazzo, Pietro da Cortona was commissioned to execute the pair of compositions on the ceiling of the gallery, dating before 1626. Like others of the Mattei family, Asdrubale Mattei was an enthusiastic patron of the arts. Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (better known simply as Caravaggio) is recorded as living at the palazzo in 1601. (Text based on Wikipedia).

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A detail from a courtyard of Palazzo Mattei di GioveA detail from a courtyard of Palazzo Mattei di GioveA detail from a courtyard of Palazzo Mattei di GioveA detail from a courtyard of Palazzo Mattei di GioveSant'Andrea della Valle church dome seen from the Palazzo Mattei di Giove
The Baroque interior of the church of Santa Barbara dei Librai in Rome. 
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The Baroque interior of the church of Santa Barbara dei Librai in Rome.
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The façade of Santa Barbara dei Librai (a detail from the crib inside)
Inside the 16th century church of Il Gesù in Rome. 
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Inside the 16th century church of Il Gesù in Rome.

This baroque church, located in the Piazza del Gesù, is the mother church of the Jesuit order. It introduced the baroque style into architecture and served as model for innumerable Jesuit churches all over the world. Although Michelangelo, at the request of the Spanish cardinal Bartolomeo de la Cueva, offered, out of devotion, to design the church for free, the endeavor was funded by Cardinal Alessandro Farnese, grandson of Pope Paul III, the pope who had authorized the founding of the Society of Jesus. Ultimately, the main architects involved in the construction were Giacomo Barozzi da Vignola, architect of the Farnese family, and Giacomo della Porta. The most striking feature of the interior decoration is the ceiling fresco is the grandiose Triumph of the Name of Jesus by Giovanni Battista Gaulli. Gaulli also frescoed the cupola, including lantern and pendentives, central vault, window recesses, and transepts' ceilings. (Text based on Wikipedia).
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Frescoes in the Il Gesù church in RomeFrescoes in the Il Gesù church in Rome
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