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A Spanish tower near San Giovanni di Sinis, Sardinia. 
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A Spanish tower near San Giovanni di Sinis, Sardinia.

This torre de armas from the late 16th century gives you fabulous views of the Capo San Marco and the Oristano Bay. Below you can spot two white columns from the famous ruins of the Roman city of Tharros.
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Inside the Basilica della Santissima Trinità di Saccargia, the most important Romanesque church of Sardinia. 
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Inside the Basilica della Santissima Trinità di Saccargia, the most important Romanesque church of Sardinia.

"Standing tall and solitary amid the surrounding flat country, its zebra-striped facade and belltower conspicuously mark its Pisan origins. The church was built in 1116, and supposedly owes its remote location to a divine visitation that took place while the giudice of Torres and his wife stopped here on the way to Porto Torres, where they intended to pray for a child at San Gavino's shrine. During the night, a celestial messenger informed the giudice's wife that the pilgrimage was unnecessary since she was already pregnant, whereupon the grateful giudice built an abbey on this spot. [...] Showing elements of Lombard architecture, the stark, tall-naved interior is mostly unadorned, but for a guilded wooden pulpit embedded in one wall and some vivid eleventh- or twelfth-century frescos covering the central apse. These, illustrating scenes from the life of Christ, are attributed to a Pisan artist and are a rare example in Italy of the type of Romanesque mural. Look out, too, for a stone image at the front of the nave on the left, possibly representing Costantino I, the giudice supposed to have founded the church and thought to be buried here." (Robert Andrews: The Rough Guide to Sardinia, 2004).
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Basilica della Santissima Trinità di SaccargiaBasilica della Santissima Trinità di Saccargia - frescos in the apseBasilica della Santissima Trinità di Saccargia - frescos in the apseBasilica della Santissima Trinità di Saccargia - frescos in the apse
The night view of Cagliari, the capital city of Sardinia, from the 19th-century Bastion of Saint Remy. 
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The night view of Cagliari, the capital city of Sardinia, from the 19th-century Bastion of Saint Remy.

"Cagliari is very steep. Half-way up there is a strange place called the bastions, a large, level space like a drill-ground with trees, curiously suspended over the town, and sending off a long shoot like a wide viaduct, across above the corkscrew street that comes climbing up. Above this bastion place the town still rises steeply to the Cathedral and the fort. What is so curious is that this terrace or bastion is so large, like some big recreation ground, that it is almost dreary, and one cannot understand its being suspended in mid-air. Down below is the little circle of the harbour. To the left a low, malarial-looking sea plain, with tufts of palm trees and Arab-looking houses. From this runs out the long spit of land towards that black-and-white watch-fort, the white road trailing forth. On the right, most curiously, a long strange spit of sand runs in a causeway far across the shallows of the bay, with the open sea on one hand, and vast, end-of-the-world lagoons on the other. There are peaky, dark mountains beyond this—just as across the vast bay are gloomy hills. It is a strange, strange landscape: as if here the world left off. The bay is vast in itself; and all these curious things happening at its head: this curious, craggy-studded town, like a great stud of house-covered rock jutting up out of the bay flats: around it on one side the weary, Arab-looking palm-desolated malarial plain, and on the other side great salt lagoons, dead beyond the sand-bar: these backed again by serried, clustered mountains, suddenly, while away beyond the plain, hills rise to sea again. Land and sea both seem to give out, exhausted, at the bay head: the world's end. And into this world's end starts up Cagliari, and on either side, sudden, serpent-crest hills." (D. H. Lawrence: Sea and Sardinia, New York 1921).
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Inside the Cathedral of St. Mary and St. Cecilia in Cagliari, the capital of Sardinia, Italy. 
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Inside the Cathedral of St. Mary and St. Cecilia in Cagliari, the capital of Sardinia, Italy.

"The church was built in the 13th century in Pisan-Romanesque style, obtaining cathedral status in 1258. In the 17th and 18th centuries it was renovated along Baroque lines. In the 1930s it finally received the current façade, in Neo-Romanesque style, inspired by Pisa Cathedral.
The church was built by the Pisans in their stronghold overlooking the city, Castel di Castro. It has a square plan, with a nave and two aisles, the latter having cross vaults, while the nave had a wooden ceiling. In 1258, after the Pisans had destroyed the capital of the Giudicato of Cagliari, Santa Igia, and its cathedral, it became the seat of the diocese of Cagliari.
In the 14th century the transept was built, giving the cathedral a Latin cross groundplan, and the two side entrances. The façade received a Gothic mullioned window and the bell tower was also modified. From the same period the first chapel comes, in Italian Gothic style, in the transept's left arm. The right transept was completed after the conquest of Cagliari by the Aragonese, and two additional chapels were built.
In 1618 the presbytery was elevated in order to build a sanctuary for several relics of martyrs. The interior and the façade were re-structured in Baroque style in 1669-1704. A cupola was built at the center of the transept, and the latter's Gothic chapels were removed.
The old façade was demolished in the early 20th century, and replaced by a Neo-Romanesque one, along the same lines of the original design, during the 1930s.
In the interior, the main attraction is the ambo of Guglielmo, a 12th-century pair of pulpits by one Master Guglielmo, originally sculpted for the cathedral of Pisa. It was taken to Cagliari in 1312 and placed in the nave, near to its third column. In 1669 it was split in two, and the two pulpits placed in their current locations. The four marble lions which supported the ambo are now located at the feet of the presbytery balustrade. Sculptures include scenes from the New Testament.
Other artworks include a 15th-century Flemish triptych (also known as Triptych of Clement VII), attributed to Rogier van der Weyden, and the Baroque funerary monument to Bernardo de La Cabra, archbishop of Cagliari, who died in the plague of 1655, while the left transept houses a 14th-century chapel and the mausoleum of the Aragonese King Martin I of Sicily, built in 1676-1680. (Martin died during the conquest of Sardinia in the early 15th century)." (Text from Wikipedia).
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A narrow cobblestone street in the medieval part of Bosa, Sardinia, Italy. 
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A narrow cobblestone street in the medieval part of Bosa, Sardinia, Italy.
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Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
Palácio da Pena
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