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Inside the church of Santa Maria dei Miracoli, one of the twin churches on Piazza del Popolo in Rome, Italy. 
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Inside the church of Santa Maria dei Miracoli, one of the twin churches on Piazza del Popolo in Rome, Italy.

Wikipedia: "Santa Maria dei Miracoli and Santa Maria di Montesanto are two churches in Rome.

They are located on the Piazza del Popolo, facing the northern gate of the Aurelian Walls, at the entrance of Via del Corso on the square. The churches are often cited as "twin", due to their similar external appearance: they have indeed some differences, in both plan and exterior details.

Looking from the square, the two churches define the so-called "trident" of streets departing from Piazza del Popolo: starting from the left, Via del Babuino, Via del Corso and Via di Ripetta. The first two are separated by Santa Maria in Montesanto, the latter by Santa Maria dei Miracoli.

The origin of the two churches traces back to the 17th century restoration of what was the main entrance to the Middle Ages and Renaissance Rome, from the Via Flaminia (known as Via Lata and Via del Corso in its urban trait). Pope Alexander VII commissioned the monumental design of the entrance of Via del Corso to architect Carlo Rainaldi. This included two churches with central plant, but the different shapes of the two areas available forced deep modifications to the projects.

Both were financed by cardinal Girolamo Gastaldi, whose crest is present in the two churches. [...]

Santa Maria dei Miracoli was begun in 1675 and finished in 1681. With a circular plan, it has an elegant 18th century bell tower by Girolamo Theodoli and an octagonal cupola. The interior has a rich stucco decoration by Antonio Raggi, Bernini's pupil. The monuments for Cardinals Benedetto and Gastaldi were designed by Carlo Fontana, who also provided design for the cupola and the lamp. The busts in bronze were completed by Girolamo Lucenti. At the high altar is the miraculous image of the Virgin which has given the church its name. The first chapel on the right-hand side has an altar dedicated to Our Lady of Bétharram, named after a shrine near Lourdes.".

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Inside the Basilica of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome. 
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Inside the Basilica of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome.

It is one of the Seven Pilgrim Churches of Rome. According to tradition, the basilica was consecrated around 325 to house the Passion Relics brought to Rome from the Holy Land by St. Helena of Constantinople, mother of the Roman Emperor Constantine I. At that time, the basilica floor was covered with soil from Jerusalem, thus acquiring the title in Hierusalem - it is not dedicated to the Holy Cross which is in Jerusalem, but the church itself is "in Jerusalem" in the sense that a "piece" of Jerusalem was moved to Rome for its foundation.

The church is built around a room in St. Helena's imperial palace, Palazzo Sessoriano, which she adapted to a chapel around the year 320. Some decades later, the chapel was turned into a true basilica, called the Heleniana or Sessoriana. After falling into neglect, the church was restored by Pope Lucius II (1144-1145). In the occasion it assumed a Romanesque appearance, with a nave and two aisles, a belfry and a porch. [...] The apse of church includes frescoes telling the Legends of the True Cross, attributed to Melozzo, to Antoniazzo Romano and Marco Palmezzano. (Text from Wikipedia).

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The Chapel of the Passion Relics in the Basilica of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome. 
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The Chapel of the Passion Relics in the Basilica of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome.

This modern chapel, built in 1930, houses many relics of the Passion of Christ: two thorns from the crown of thorns; a nail from the Crucifixion; the Titulus, part of the Title of the Cross originally bearing the words "Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews"; three splinters of the True Cross; a part of the cross of the good thief; fragments from the Pillar of the Scourging; and the finger that Saint Thomas placed in Christ's side.
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Inside the Basilica of Saint Lawrence outside the Walls (San Lorenzo fuori le mura) in Rome. 
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Inside the Basilica of Saint Lawrence outside the Walls (San Lorenzo fuori le mura) in Rome.

"What makes this church so architecturally fascinating is the fact that the present building is formed from the union of two plainly visible structures. As one proceeds down the nave and up the steps to the altar (all belonging to the thirteenth-century building), the capitals and upper shafts of the columns of the original sixth-century church come into view on either side. Leaning over the railing of the chancel, you can see the rest of these columns with their bases and pedestals twelve feet below." (Robert Kahn (Ed.): City Secrets Rome: The Essential Insider’s Guide, 2011).
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Inside the Basilica of Saint Agnes outside the Walls in Rome. 
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Inside the Basilica of Saint Agnes outside the Walls in Rome.

Wikipedia: The church of Saint Agnes Outside the Wall (Italian: Sant'Agnese fuori la mura) is a titulus church, minor basilica in Rome, on a site sloping down from the Via Nomentana, which runs north-east out of the city, still under its ancient name. What is said to be the remains of Saint Agnes's are below the high altar. The church is over one of the catacombs of Rome, where Agnes was originally buried, and which still may be visited from the church. The church was built by Pope Honorius I in the 7th century, and largely retains its original structure, despite many changes to the decoration. In particular the mosaic in the apse of Agnes, Honorius and another Pope is largely in its original condition.
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Inside the church of Sant'Agnese fuori le Mura, RomeMosaics in the church of Sant'Agnese fuori le Mura, RomeMosaics in the church of Sant'Agnese fuori le Mura, RomeMosaics in the church of Sant'Agnese fuori le Mura, Rome
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