Not working? Install DevalVR, QT or Flash  polski English RSS feedFollow us on TwitterFollow me on Pinterest
Search in panoramas:
»
The courtyard in front of the San Clemente church in Rome. 
Click to view this panorama in new fullscreen window
The courtyard in front of the San Clemente church in Rome.

"Simply the most quintessentially Roman building in Rome: seventeen hundred years or so of Roman history, art, architecture, religion, and life piled one on top of another, woven into each other, still visible. From the bizarre, three levels down (a very well-preserved Mithraeum), to the stunningly beautiful top level (the remarkable gold mosaic of the Tree of Life rivals any of the famed mosaics in Ravenna or anywhere else) to the virtually incomprehensible but still compelling jumble of the fourth-century church and its successors in between, there is nothing like this Rome in a nutshell." (Joseph J. Walsh, Professor of Classics and History at Loyola University Maryland, in Robert Kahn's City Secrets: Rome).
• Added to the gallery on File size: 3.8 MBViews: 2393 (#2334)
Inside the Church of Domine Quo Vadis in Via Appia Antica in Rome. 
Click to view this panorama in new fullscreen window
Inside the Church of Domine Quo Vadis in Via Appia Antica in Rome.

"The Church of St Mary in Palmis, better known as Chiesa del Domine Quo Vadis, is a small church southeast of Rome, central Italy. It is located about some 800 m from Porta San Sebastiano, where the Via Ardeatina branches off the Appian Way, on the site where, according to the legend, Saint Peter met Jesus while the former was fleeing persecution in Rome. According to the apocryphal Acts of Peter, Peter asked Jesus, "Lord, where are you going?" (Latin: Domine, quo vadis?). Jesus answered, "I am going to Rome to be crucified again". There has been a sanctuary on the spot since the ninth century, but the current church is from 1637. The current façade was added in the 17th century." (Text from Wikipedia).
• Added to the gallery on File size: 3.2 MBViews: 3573 (#1893)
Imprint of Christ's feet in the Domine Quo Vadis churchBust of Henryk Sienkiewicz in the Domine Quo Vadis church
Inside the church of Sant'Ivo alla Sapienza in Rome, a Baroque masterpiece built in 1642-1660 by Francesco Borromini. 
Click to view this panorama in new fullscreen window
Inside the church of Sant'Ivo alla Sapienza in Rome, a Baroque masterpiece built in 1642-1660 by Francesco Borromini.

"The church started out, around the 14th century, as a chapel of the palace of the University of Rome. The University is called La Sapienza, and the church is devoted to St. Yves (patron saint of jurists), giving the church its name. Borromini was forced to adapt his design to the already existing palace. He chose a plan resembling a star of David, and merged the facade of the church with the courtyard of the palace. The dome, with its corkscrew lantern, is remarkable in its novelty. The complex rhythms of the interior have a dazzling geometry. It is a rational architecture - intricate to view, but on paper the overlap of a circle on two superimposed equilateral triangles creates a basis for a hexagonal array of chapels and altar in a centralized church. The undulations, both concave and convex of the interiors, create a jarring yet stunning appeal. The decoration is a mixture of novel organic (six-winged cherubic heads) and geometric (stars), more platonic than the contemporary gilded and plaster excesses of Gianlorenzo Bernini. Rising along the base of three of the dome’s pillars are the symbol of the papal Chigi family, the "six mountain beneath a star". The main artwork of the interior is the altarpiece by Pietro da Cortona, portraying St. Yves." (Churches of Rome Wiki, CC-BY-SA).
• Added to the gallery on File size: 2.6 MBViews: 4221 (#1646)
Sant'Ivo alla Sapienza, RomeSant'Ivo alla Sapienza, RomeSant'Ivo alla Sapienza, RomeSant'Ivo alla Sapienza, RomeSant'Ivo alla Sapienza, RomeSant'Ivo alla Sapienza, RomeSant'Ivo alla Sapienza, RomeRome from the Gianicolo Hill: Pantheon on the right and the dome of Sant'Ivo alla Sapienza on the left
Inside the church of Sant'Eustachio in Rome. 
Click to view this panorama in new fullscreen window
Inside the church of Sant'Eustachio in Rome.

"The church was founded in the 8th century, or possibly even earlier. The church was recorded as a diaconia (a centre for helping the poor and the sick) at the end of the pontificate of Pope Gregory II (715-731). It is mentioned in some documents dating from the 10th and 11th centuries, where this church is called in platana (between the plane trees) referring to the tree planted in the garden of the martyr Eustace. The emperor Constantine I had previously built an oratory on this same spot. This church was called "ad Pantheon in regione nona e iuxta templum Agrippae" (at the Pantheon in the ninth region and next to the temple of Agrippa").

The church was restored (including the addition of a new campanile). at the end of the 12th century during the pontificate of Pope Celestine III (1191–1198), who also deposited the relics of the martyr in the church. In the 16th century, it was a favoured praying-place for St Philip Neri. In the 17th and 18th centuries it was almost completely rebuilt (with only the campanile remaining from the old structure) by several architects : Cesare Corvara and Giovanni Battista Contini (1641–1723), who added chapels and the portico, Antonio Canevari (1681–1750), Nicola Salvi (1697–1751) and finally, from 1728, Giovanni Domenico Navone. The new high altar, in bronze and polychrome marble, was added by Nicola Salvi in 1739 and in 1749 Ferdinando Fuga put a baldachin over it. The choir and the sacristy were realized by Giovanni Moscati (but designed by Canevari). The church was designed in Roman Baroque style." (Text from Wikipedia).

• Added to the gallery on File size: 4.0 MBViews: 2503 (#2286)
Sant'Eustachio, RomeNativity scene at Sant'Eustachio, Rome
Page
1
Locate all panoramas
Random image
Contact
Interested?
Mail me at
panoramy@zbooy.pl
Last comment
Thursday, Nov 2, 2017: On the walls of Palácio da Pena in Sintra, Portugal
Palácio da Pena
Czy to już jest koniec? :( (widz)
© Szymon "Zbooy" Madej
2005–2017